Artistic Prints and Note Cards by Janet Dodrill

November 24, 2016

By Janet Dodrill

Euclid Beach Carousel iPad art image by Janet Dodrill

Euclid Beach Carousel iPad art image by Janet Dodrill.

Looking for a unique artisan gift? You can find my note cards and prints in local Cleveland shops listed below. The themes include Cleveland landmarks, carousel horses from the Euclid Beach Carousel, nature scenes from the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, Chagrin Falls landmarks, and other subjects.

The images are photography that is manipulated using iPad art apps, and some are then put into graphic design layouts.

 

 

 

Shops:

Fireside Book Shop, 29 N Franklin St, Chagrin Falls, OH 44022, www.firesidebookshop.com (Note cards)

In The 216 shop, 1854 Coventry Road, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118, www.facebook.com/inthe216shop (Note cards, matted & loose laser prints, coloring pages)

Mac’s Backs-Books, 1820 Coventry Road, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118, www.macsbacks.com (Note cards)

Native Cleveland gift shop, 15813 Waterloo Road, Cleveland, OH 44110, www.nativecleveland.com (Note cards)

Stars on Blue, 165 E. Aurora Road, Northfield, OH 44067,www.facebook.com/StarsonBlue (Note cards, matted images, coloring pages)

The Duck Pond gift shop, Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, 2600 S. Park Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44120, www.shakerlakes.org (Note cards)

Western Reserve Historical Society gift shop, 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio 44106, www.wrhs.org (Note cards, matted & loose laser prints, coloring pages)

Visit my ETSY shop for a limited amount of original lino-cut prints at janetdodrill.etsy.com.

Chagrin Falls iPad art image by Janet Dodrill

Chagrin Falls iPad art image by Janet Dodrill.

Cleveland prints by Janet Dodrill

Cleveland prints by Janet Dodrill.

Cleveland note cards by Janet Dodrill at In The 216 gift shop

Cleveland note cards by Janet Dodrill at In The 216 gift shop.

Chagrin Falls note cards by Janet Dodrill at Fireside Book Shop

Chagrin Falls note cards by Janet Dodrill at Fireside Book Shop.

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Everything You Know About SEO Is Wrong, Sage Lewis

April 28, 2016

By Janet Dodrill

In an energetic presentation titled “Everything You Know About SEO Is Wrong” by Sage Lewis, given at The Web Association on April 19, 2016 at COSE in Cleveland, we were introduced to Google’s new RankBrain algorithm and other recent changes.

Sage Lewis is author of bestseller “Link Building is Dead. Long Live Link Building” and president of Sagerock.com, a digital marketing agency in Akron, Ohio.

According to Sage, the current most important factors for the ranking of Google’s search engine results are Content, and Links (link pointing), and now Google’s RankBrain algorithm.

RankBrain is Google’s new artificial intelligence machine that helps it process information to rank in search results. Previously at Google, humans taught machines how to interpret search data, but this machine teaches itself! It gives us the results it thinks humans want! Can this be entirely accurate?

Ultimately, he stressed, that the best way to be found online by Google and draw people in was to show love and passion for your business by expressing it through compelling content, such as relevant text, pictures, video, and use of social media like Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube, Facebook Live, and others, which could help you to create a unique story.

Another change by Google, we were informed, is the elimination of side ads. This is for mobile device responsiveness. According to Sage, mobile searches have surpassed desktop searches. All ads are now in the regular location which is at the top of the main search results (and the increased ad purchase price brings in more money for Google). This may make things more difficult for small businesses to promote their products or services.

It was mentioned that a good way to get a small business noticed online is to setup a local business at Google.com/business. Also, before optimizing your site for SEO check Google to see who the competition is. Maybe consider a different angle or emphasis on your goods in order to stand out in a less saturated arena.

Sage co-hosts a live web cast Thursday at 3:15 p.m. ET called “The Tools”  where many social media tools and ways to market your product or business are discussed. One recent tool he shared with us is the ability to now live stream on Facebook. This is a free way to draw in an audience and promote your business!

Sage Lewis of SageRock.com, digital marketing agency in Akron, Ohio.

Sage Lewis of SageRock.com, digital marketing agency in Akron, Ohio.

Resource Links:

SageRock, Inc.
www.sagerock.com

The Tools
www.thetools.tv

The Web Association
www.webassociation.org

How do I share a live video on Facebook?
www.facebook.com/help/1636872026560015
To start a live broadcast from your personal Timeline.

Get your business hours, phone number, and directions on Google Search and Maps — with Google My Business.
www.google.com/business

Sage Lewis engages the audience at The Web Association.

Sage Lewis engages the audience at The Web Association.

Sage Lewis discussed Google's RankBrain algorithm.

Sage Lewis discussed Google’s RankBrain algorithm.

Three most important things for Google search engine ranking.

Three most important things for Google search engine ranking.

COSE in Cleveland, Ohio.

COSE in Cleveland, Ohio.


Joe Pulizzi On Latest Book, Content Inc.

December 24, 2015

By Janet Dodrill

The Web Association welcomed Joe Pulizzi, Founder and CEO Content Marketing Institute.

The Web Association welcomed Joe Pulizzi, Founder and CEO Content Marketing Institute.

Last month, I heard Joe Pulizzi (@CMIContent), Founder and CEO Content Marketing Institute, speak at The Web Association, held at COSE (Council of Smaller Enterprises) in Cleveland, Ohio. He speaks on a regular basis (He noted that ours was his 71st presentation of 2015!), and has authored several books including bestselling Epic Content Marketing.

Joes Pulizzi points out ways to connect and engage on both a personal and professional level.

Joes Pulizzi points out ways to connect and engage on both a personal and professional level.

Joe discussed his newly published book, Content Inc.: How Entrepreneurs Use Content to Build Massive Audiences and Create Radically Successful Businesses, which is sold on Amazon.

Using the Content Inc. model, he reviewed the many forms of engaging through social media: social blogs, wikis, video, rating, social bookmarking, internet forums, pictures, microblogging, weblogs, and podcasts.

It was stated that the importance of communicating through the creation and distribution of your own information to build audiences is key.

A few highlights of his talk included these points:

  • Create your mission statement: have a defined audience, deliver, then measure the audience outcome.
  • Establish your content type and platform, deliver consistently over a long period of time, i.e. e-newsletter.
  • Loyal customers can mean increased product sales and revenue.

He pointed out ways to engage socially on both a personal and business level. Personal avenues include blogs, books and public speaking, whereas business methods could be digital media, print (yes, it still a valued form of communication), and in-person contact.

Takeaways:

-Find a niche and become a leading expert
-Develop your content mission
-Focus on content type, platform and delivery consistently
-Build an audience of opt-in subscribers
-Create an amazing e-newsletter and download
-Audience first, products second
-Be patient!

In his book, Content Inc., Joe breaks down the process to visualize, launch and monetize your own business, based on his own success and failures. This is explained through case studies.

Are you looking for a startup-business strategy? Perhaps kick-off the new year with his business-growing strategy. The Content Marketing Institute website is full of good information, plus there is an email news sign-up and podcast network. Also be sure to watch the 43-minute movie which explains how the marketing of the future is all about brands telling stories, in “The Story of Content: Rise of the New Marketing.”

 

Me with Joe Pulizzi!

Me with Joe Pulizzi!

Joe Pilluzi's book, Content Inc. (Joe likes the color orange and orange shoes!).

Joe Pilluzi’s book, Content Inc. (Joe likes the color orange and orange shoes!).

"Janet, go out and be epic!" – Joe Pulizzi (signed in Joe's favorite color -- orange).

“Janet, go out and be epic!” – Joe Pulizzi (signed in Joe’s favorite color — orange).

A great feature for your business website is an email signup, like that on the Content Marketing Institute site.

A great feature for your business website is an email signup, like that on the Content Marketing Institute site.

COSE, Council of Smaller Enterprises, a division of the Greater Cleveland Partnership.

COSE, Council of Smaller Enterprises, a division of the Greater Cleveland Partnership.


New Cuyahoga County Public Library South Euclid-Lyndhurst Branch Opens

October 20, 2015

By Janet Dodrill

In line to receive limited edition commemorative library card.

In line to receive limited edition commemorative library card. (Photo: Karen Sandstrom)

The long-awaited new South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of the Cuyahoga County Public Library, 1876 South Green Road, South Euclid, Ohio, 44121, had its grand opening on Sunday, October 18, 2015.

Prior to construction of the new building, there was much controversy surrounding the sale of the former building, the charming and historic William E. Telling mansion. It is claimed that the a private sale was made by library officials without the consensus of tax payers. The library claimed that the building was too expensive to maintain and did not lend itself for newer technology and accessibility. The Telling mansion was purchased by an individual who will convert the former library building into the American Porcelain Museum, due to open in spring of 2016.

The new 30,000+ square foot library is very impressive and offers state-of-the-art technology not available at the old library.

An expansive and interactive activity children’s area modeled after the book, Journey by author and illustrator Aaron Becker, has over-sized constructions, movable magnets, and hanging displays, all modeled after its book illustrations.

The youth area houses comic books which can be checked-out, a homework assistance center, and has an attached sound studio for audio recording.

South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of Cuyahoga County Public Library.

South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of Cuyahoga County Public Library.

3-D printers will travel from library to library within the Cuyahoga County Public Libraries.

A much improved larger DVD browsing area with plenty of room to walk through multiple movie racks.

Skylights and a sense of openness in the large main room, which houses the main information desk, books racks and public computer terminals. All computers have been upgraded.

I was personally impressed with the new technology training room which will offer free technology classes, and the computers are open to the public in-between classes.

Two double-sided fireplaces and all new contemporary furniture, coupled with tasteful fixtures from the previous building, like table lamps, add style and atmosphere, with designated quiet areas. A writer’s center, and individual meeting rooms with sizes for small business meetings to larger capacity conference rooms are available for reserve in at least 2-hour increments.

The natural light is wonderful, and there is a real sense of unique spaces there.

Limited edition library card, artwork by Janet Dodrill.

Limited edition library card, artwork by Janet Dodrill.

I was honored to provide the artwork for the limited edition library card, available through October 25th.

Despite missing the much-loved and unique former location and historic Telling mansion, I am very impressed with the accommodations, technological updates, and comfort the new library brings. Below are a few recent photos.

Resource Links:

Cuyahoga County Public Library

Cuyahoga County Public Library, South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch

3,600 celebrate opening of new South Euclid-Lyndhurst library, Cleveland Jewish News, October 20, 2015

South Euclid-Lyndhurst Library branch opening Sunday draws hundreds, Sun News, October 18, 2015

(Text and photos copyright Janet Dodrill. Not to be used without prior permission.)

 

South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of Cuyahoga County Public Library, grand opening.

South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch of Cuyahoga County Public Library, grand opening.

 

New Cuyahoga County Public Library South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch.

New Cuyahoga County Public Library South Euclid-Lyndhurst branch.

 

Library grand opening crowd.

Library grand opening crowd.

 

Main library lounge area with fireplace.

Main library lounge area with fireplace.

 

Main library quiet area with fireplace.

Main library quiet area with fireplace.

 

Kiosk at new library.

Kiosk at new library.

 

Library staff Dianne Rose on left.

Library staff Dianne Rose on left. (Photo: Stuart Smith)

 

Library grand opening dedication plaque.

Library grand opening dedication plaque.

 

Main library area and information desk.

Main library area and information desk.

 

Main library area.

Main library area.

 

Reserved parking for fuel efficient vehicles.

Reserved parking for fuel efficient vehicles.

 

Writer's center area.

Writer’s center area.

 

Magnet poem activity in writer's center.

Magnet poem activity in writer’s center.

 

Technology learning center.

Technology learning center.

 

Sound studio for audio recording.

Sound studio for audio recording.

 

Youth area.

Youth area.

 

Children's area.

Children’s area.

 

"Journey" by Aaron Becker.

“Journey” by Aaron Becker.

 

Children's area, decorated with inspiration from the book "Journey" by Aaron Becker.

Children’s area, decorated with inspiration from the book “Journey” by Aaron Becker.

 

Children's area castle display, based on the book "Journey" by Aaron Becker.

Children’s area castle display, based on the book “Journey” by Aaron Becker.

 

Children's area magnet board activity.

Children’s area magnet board activity.

 

Children's area lounge.

Children’s area lounge.

 

Motion sensor activity, children's area.

Motion sensor activity, children’s area.

 

Free donuts for the grand opening from DonutLab.

Free donuts for the grand opening from DonutLab.

 

Free donuts for the grand opening from DonutLab.

Free donuts for the grand opening from DonutLab.


Cooper Hewitt Museum at Smithsonian Offers Large Sample Collection of Schmitz-Horning Wallcoverings

September 22, 2015

By Janet Dodrill

For design and wallpaper lovers, Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian’s Design Museum, has an entire section of wall covering samples from the Schmitz-Horning Company of Cleveland, Ohio. As a gift of the Wallpaper Council, Inc., the collection has dozens of patterns and color variations, printed as chromo-lithographs, mostly believed to be from the 1930s and 1940s.

Scenic Hudson, Scenic-Panels by Schmitz-Horning Co., 1930-1940, Cooper Hewitt, Gift of Scott Cazet

Scenic Hudson, Scenic-Panels by Schmitz-Horning Co., 1930-1940, Cooper Hewitt, Gift of Scott Cazet

The company was known for upscale lithographic wallpaper, friezes, art murals, and scenic panoramics, printed with oil-based inks onto high-quality paper, and was in business between 1905 and 1960. They used some of the largest zinc printing plates in the country, with an image area of roughly 80″ x 40″. The paper was fully washable.

The design museum owns one full set, a four-part scenic mural called ‘Scenic Hudson,’ a lovely pattern that they describe, “captures a romantic view of the Hudson River.” What’s also great is that Cooper Hewitt includes a detailed description of the work with accompanying audio. This set was the gift of Scott Cazet.

Additionally, Schmitz-Horning offered a selection of large-scale wall maps. The Cooper Hewitt museum has two adjoining sections of a beautifully illustrated map, ‘Smuggler’s Cove,’ designed by established Cleveland area artist Glenn M. Shaw, who contracted on several designs with the company. Again, the museum offers details and audio on the pattern.

Smuggler's Cove by Schmitz-Horning Co., 1930-1940, Cooper Hewitt, Gift of Wallpaper Council, Inc.

Smuggler’s Cove by Schmitz-Horning Co., 1930-1940, Cooper Hewitt, Gift of Wallpaper Council, Inc.

Although the museum is still in the process of digitizing the samples to post on their website, I have created a category on my Pinterest page of Schmitz-Horning work currently on their site. I have a special interest in the history, since my great-grandfather, Hugo M. Schmitz, co-founded and served as president of the company, until his death, when it was then operated by my grandfather, Warren R. Schmitz. I am thrilled that these samples were preserved and thanks to the digital age they are now being shared.

Cooper Hewitt has undertaken a huge (ongoing) effort to make the Schmitz-Horning Co. samples available as resources for the general public, researchers, and enthusiasts.

Resource Links:

Cooper Hewitt / The Schmitz-Horning Co.
https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/people/18046573/

Cooper Hewitt / Schmitz Horning / Objects Of The Day
http://www.cooperhewitt.org/tag/schmitz-horning/

(Pictured) Chinese Embroidery Scenic-Panel by Schmitz-Horning Co., 1930-1940, Cooper Hewitt, Gift of Wallpaper Council, Inc.
https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18431485/

Chinese Embroidery Scenic-Panel by Schmitz-Horning Co., 1930-1940, Cooper Hewitt, Gift of Wallpaper Council, Inc.

Chinese Embroidery Scenic-Panel by Schmitz-Horning Co., 1930-1940, Cooper Hewitt, Gift of Wallpaper Council, Inc.

 

Images from Cooperhewitt.org used under the Fair Use copyright act.


Schmitz-Horning Co. Catalogs, Lithos Digitized at Cleveland Public Library and CleDPL

August 15, 2015

By Janet Dodrill

CleDPL library assistant Ray Rozman scans an original Schmitz-Horning Co. wall mural design.

CleDPL library assistant Ray Rozman scans an original Schmitz-Horning Co. wall mural design.

In going through the family house a few years ago, I discovered catalogs and samples from my great-grandfather’s former Cleveland-based business, the Schmitz-Horning Company. Since then, I have been researching and learning about the company, and our family’s role in the company.

The Schmitz-Horning Company, which specialized in high quality washable color wallpaper, artistic murals and scenic panoramic wall coverings, was founded around 1905 by Hugo M. Schmitz I, an artist and my great-grandfather, and William (Bill) Horning, a lithographer. Mr. Horning left the partnership around 1920. My grandfather (Hugo’s son), Warren R. Schmitz, acted as vice president of the company starting in the late 1920s. After the tragic automobile-related death of Hugo Schmitz in 1938, Warren Schmitz served as president of the company.

Through Google, Cleveland’s newspaper The Plain Dealer archives through the Cuyahoga County Public Library’s website, and family materials, I have started my journey of piecing together a historical footprint of the company and some of the people that worked at the company.

CPL Map/GIS librarian Tom Edwards scans a Schmitz-Horning scenic wallpaper design.

CPL Map/GIS librarian Tom Edwards scans a Schmitz-Horning scenic wallpaper design.

Recently, I discovered the public resources available at Cleveland Public Library in downtown Cleveland. Over several trips there, I visited the Cleveland Digital Public Library (CleDPL) (under the direction of Chatham Ewing, Digital Library Strategist), at 325 Superior Avenue, 3rd floor, the map department and the history department at 525 Superior Avenue, 6th floor, the business department on the 2nd floor, and the photograph collection on the 4th floor, and as a patron received assistance in researching and in documentation of our family’s materials.

Additionally, I was made aware of the Cleveland Public Library Digital Gallery, the library’s public online digital gallery.

Panoramic Friezes catalog, 1909-1910, the Schmitz-Horning Company, Cleveland, Ohio.

Panoramic Friezes catalog, 1909-1910, the Schmitz-Horning Company, Cleveland, Ohio.

A dedicated library staff assisted and enabled me to do extensive high resolution and large-scale scanning of our deteriorating Schmitz-Horning original wallpaper designs and mural lithographs, and multiple company catalogs, with an early one dating back to 1909, and most being the only known catalogs in existence. The Cleveland Digital Public Library, a new department since spring of this year, accommodated me for many hours spread over several weeks by assisting me with scans on an i2s SupraScan Quartz overhead scanner, synced to a pc, with size capabilities up to 33″ x 46″. They suggested methods regarding the preservation and storing of the materials. Other equipment available included an Epson Expression 10000 XL for photographs, and several book scanners, one high-speed ATIZ scanner, and one a versatile and user-friendly Knowledge Imaging Center (KIC) scanner. The map department had a large-scale feed-through type scanner (plus printer), a Hewlett Packer Designjet T1200 HD MFP, which scans up to 41″ wide by any length, which enabled me to scan one-of-a-kind lithographic wallpaper rolls, some over 100 inches long.

A selection of the materials scanned will be available on the Cleveland Public Library Digital Gallery, making documentation on this historic Cleveland business available to the public. Individuals researching companies in the wallpaper industry may also find it useful.

Other Schmitz-Horning blog posts by Janet Dodrill:

Schmitz-Horning Co. Artists Created Impressive Lithographic Murals and Scenic Wallpaper

Google Cultural Institute

Schmitz-Horning Co. Ming Floral Scenic Wallpaper Pattern

Schmitz-Horning Company Created Wallpaper Murals and Art

Articles about Cleveland Digital Public Library:

Cleveland Digital Public Library Will Offer High-Tech Scanning For The Masses

Ohio: Grand Opening of Cleveland Digital Public Library (ClevDPL) Taking Place Today

Ohio Public Libraries Receive Grant Funding To Create Network Of Coordinated Digitization Hubs

Curtis Flowers scans a Schmitz-Horning Co. lithograph on CleDPL's large overhead scanner.

Curtis Flowers scans a Schmitz-Horning Co. lithograph on CleDPL’s large overhead scanner.

The Cleveland Digital Public Library (CleDPL) department of Cleveland Public Library

The Cleveland Digital Public Library (CleDPL) department of Cleveland Public Library.

Book Scanner at Cleveland Digital Public Library

Book Scanner at Cleveland Digital Public Library.

Copyright article and images. All rights reserved. Not to be used without permission.


The National Gallery Online Art Collection

July 18, 2015

By Janet Dodrill

the national galleryThe National Gallery (@NationalGallery) tweeted on July 16, 2015 that now images can be downloaded from their collection for personal use! That got me interested in exploring their website www.nationalgallery.org.uk. Here are a few links to good resources, I discovered there, for the art enthusiast!

Online Collection:
www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings

Explore the paintings:
Collection overview, 30 ‘must-see’ paintings, paintings room by room, a virtual tour of over 300 paintings, the picture of the month, the latest loans and acquisitions, and more.
www.nationalgallery.org.uk/view-the-collection

This month, the picture of the month is Peter Paul Rubens, A Roman Triumph, about 1630, with free downloadable wallpaper:
www.nationalgallery.org.uk/upload/img/wallpaper-rubens-a-roman-triumph-ng278.jpg

Download the iPhone app:
www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/learn-about-art

The National Gallery Channel:
Watch video and learn about hidden symbolism in paintings, techniques of the old masters, contemporary artists, impressionism, and more.
www.nationalgallery.org.uk/channel

The National Gallery Podcasts:
Listen to information on Cézanne, Manet, Rembrandt, Bruegel, Monet, Millet, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and more.
www.nationalgallery.org.uk/podcasts

Caring for the paintings:
www.nationalgallery.org.uk/paintings/caring-for-the-paintings

 

wallpaper-rubens-a-roman-triumph-ng278

Peter Paul Rubens, A Roman Triumph, about 1630, wallpaper download from the National Gallery website.