Artistic Prints and Note Cards by Janet Dodrill

November 24, 2016

By Janet Dodrill

Euclid Beach Carousel iPad art image by Janet Dodrill

Euclid Beach Carousel iPad art image by Janet Dodrill.

Looking for a unique artisan gift? You can find my note cards and prints in local Cleveland shops listed below. The themes include Cleveland landmarks, carousel horses from the Euclid Beach Carousel, nature scenes from the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, Chagrin Falls landmarks, and other subjects.

The images are photography that is manipulated using iPad art apps, and some are then put into graphic design layouts.

 

 

 

Shops:

Fireside Book Shop, 29 N Franklin St, Chagrin Falls, OH 44022, www.firesidebookshop.com (Note cards)

In The 216 shop, 1854 Coventry Road, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118, www.facebook.com/inthe216shop (Note cards, matted & loose laser prints, coloring pages)

Mac’s Backs-Books, 1820 Coventry Road, Cleveland Heights, OH 44118, www.macsbacks.com (Note cards)

Native Cleveland gift shop, 15813 Waterloo Road, Cleveland, OH 44110, www.nativecleveland.com (Note cards)

Stars on Blue, 165 E. Aurora Road, Northfield, OH 44067,www.facebook.com/StarsonBlue (Note cards, matted images, coloring pages)

The Duck Pond gift shop, Nature Center at Shaker Lakes, 2600 S. Park Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44120, www.shakerlakes.org (Note cards)

Western Reserve Historical Society gift shop, 10825 East Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio 44106, www.wrhs.org (Note cards, matted & loose laser prints, coloring pages)

Visit my ETSY shop for a limited amount of original lino-cut prints at janetdodrill.etsy.com.

Chagrin Falls iPad art image by Janet Dodrill

Chagrin Falls iPad art image by Janet Dodrill.

Cleveland prints by Janet Dodrill

Cleveland prints by Janet Dodrill.

Cleveland note cards by Janet Dodrill at In The 216 gift shop

Cleveland note cards by Janet Dodrill at In The 216 gift shop.

Chagrin Falls note cards by Janet Dodrill at Fireside Book Shop

Chagrin Falls note cards by Janet Dodrill at Fireside Book Shop.

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Warren R. Cox, Headed Sales at Schmitz-Horning Co.

July 17, 2016

By Janet Dodrill

Warren R. Cox, early 1900s.

Warren R. Cox, early 1900s.

Schmitz-Horning Company, a former well-established Cleveland wall covering firm, 1905-1960, had a dedicated staff which included head salesman, Warren Richard Cox (1880-1960). In 1906 a patent was granted for the printed frieze for walls, and signed by co-owners Hugo M. Schmitz I (my great-grandfather, 1867-1938), artist and lithographer, and William Horning, lithographer, along with Warren R. Cox (http://www.google.com/patents/US830931).

Hugo Max Schmitz married Pauline Maynard Reynolds (“Queen”) in Cleveland in 1902. In 1905 they had a son named Warren Reynolds Schmitz. It is thought that he was named either after Queen’s brother Warren who died in 1897 at age 18 in a tragic hunting accident, or after Warren R. Cox, a close family friend (or both).

Warren was not only salesman at Schmitz-Horning, but on his own he was an inventor. He created the automobile ignition lock (patent approved 1920), an idea which was apparently sparked by Hugo’s stolen Packard (http://www.google.com/patents/US1334292). The lock was later sold to Ford which helped to finance his entrance into radio. Starting as a ham radio operator, he became a pioneer in Ohio and founded its first public radio station, WHK, in 1921. Prior to founding the radio station, he sold batteries and then radios. He learned there was a lack of radio music available for the general public and the station was formed to create something to play on his radios, which in those days involved live music and entertainment on site. He carried patents for a variety of items.

Warren Cox’s son Wilson married Margaret Elanor Hale, and artist. Her mother, Margaret Zeller Hale (widow of Alcazar Hotel builder George W. Hale) was on a weekend drive with Hugo and Queen Schmitz and died in an automobile crash in 1938 along with Hugo.

Hugo Schmitz and son Warren Schmitz, Wilson Cox (Warren Cox’s son), Hugo’s wife Queen Schmitz, and Elsie Cox enjoy an outing in nature.

Copyright article and images. All rights reserved. Not to be used without permission.

Schmitz and Cox families.

Hugo Schmitz I and son Warren Schmitz, Wilson Cox (Warren Cox’s son), Hugo’s wife Queen Schmitz, and Elsie Cox enjoy an outing in nature. (Photograph possibly taken by Warren Cox.)

 


Buy/Sell Art Images Online

March 28, 2015

By Janet Dodrill

Artists, Photographers, Designers! Are you selling your images online? There’s a community online of people selling their images at FineArtAmerica.com. I created a shop at http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/janet-dodrill.html and am still adding to it. A variety of items are available for purchase from each image and pricing can be determined, plus, the rights to the images remain your own. Up to 25 images can be posted for free. FineArtAmerica.com does the rest, output of the image, any matting and framing or assemblage, shipping and billing. And satisfaction guaranteed!

In addition to unframed prints and matted and framed prints, my shop offers images on greeting cards, metal or acrylic, pillows and iPhone cases. Visit my shop, or browse and get inspired! You can even create a shop of your own.

Profile page and art images at FineArtAmercia.com.

Profile page and art images at FineArtAmercia.com.


The Effects of Waterlogue

October 22, 2014

By Janet Dodrill

Have you heard of the iPhone and iPad app called Waterlogue? The app converts your photos into beautiful watercolor-like images. It is published by Tinrocket, LLC and was co-created by John Balestrieri (Tinrocket, LLC) and Robert Clair (Chromatic Bytes, LLC). Available on iTunes for $2.99, it has a 4+ customer rating.

It is one of my favorite art apps to use. I create custom note cards using images that I first shoot on the iPad and then run them through Waterlogue.

Below are a few images (before and after) I created using various filters in the app.

iPad photo and Waterlogue app image.

iPad photo and Waterlogue app image.

iPad photo and Waterlogue app image.

iPad photo and Waterlogue app image.


The Nature Center at Shaker Lakes Series

June 23, 2014

Update, August 23, 2014: The digital art series mentioned in this blog post will be displayed at a future date at the Nature Center. The work on display there during ‘Raiders of the Lost Art’ exhibit includes my traditional oil paintings, acrylics, drawing and lino-cut prints, in addition to the work of Eugenia Vainberg and members of The Western Reserve Calligraphers Club.

 

By Janet Dodrill

Art by Janet Dodrill in the Duck Pond gift shop, at the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes.

Art by Janet Dodrill in the Duck Pond gift shop, at the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes.

A few months ago I brought some art work in for consignment at the gift shop, the Duck Pond, at the Nature Center at Shaker Lakes. Bringing only nature-themed work, the work includes note cards, lino-cut prints, art prints, mini oil paintings and wreaths.

Since then, I developed a new body of work. With an iPad, I photographed nature on the premises of the Nature Center, ran them through an art app, and created what I call ‘The Nature Center at Shaker Lakes Series.’ Some of these images are currently for sale in the gift shop on large note cards.

Note Cards by Janet Dodrill at the Duck Pond gift shop, at the Nature Center of Shaker Lakes.

Note Cards by Janet Dodrill at the Duck Pond gift shop, at the Nature Center of Shaker Lakes.

My contact there asked if I would participate in a group art exhibit in their gallery, for works that are nature-based, entitled ‘Raiders of the Lost Art’ running August 18 through November 7, 2014. Some of the images from this series will be enlarged to include in the show.

The Nature Center is located at 2600 South Park Boulevard, Shaker Heights, Ohio 44120, www.shakerlakes.org.

The Nature Center at Shaker Lakes iPad photo art by Janet Dodrill.

The Nature Center at Shaker Lakes iPad photo art by Janet Dodrill.


iPhone’s iOS6 Panorama Camera Feature

April 12, 2013

By Janet Dodrill

Have you experienced the panoramic photography option on iPhone 5’s using iOS6 (or iPhone 4S)? It can take up to a full 240-degree photo.

With little or no experience, one can create digital panoramic still pictures. With the iPhone 5, hold the camera vertically and access the camera app, press the camera shutter button and gently move the camera on a level horizontal path until you have captured the desired composition and then press the camera button again. The image will save to your camera roll. (Hold the camera horizontally and move the camera up to create a ‘vertorama’!)

These are panoramic images I created recently using the iPhone 5:

Verizon Store Panoramic by Janet Dodrill

Verizon Store Panoramic by Janet Dodrill.

 

 

 

 

 

Chicago Panoramic by Janet Dodrill

Chicago Panoramic by Janet Dodrill.

 

 

 

 

 

Kovels Antiques, Inc. Panoramic by Janet Dodrill

Kovels Antiques, Inc. Panoramic by Janet Dodrill

 

 

 

 

 

How-To Video Resources:

Mastering panoramic photography in iOS 6 (CNET)

How to take panorama photos in iOS 6 on the iPhone 5 (CNET)


Old Cleveland Postcards

December 22, 2012

By Janet Dodrill

euclid avenue cleveland ohio postcard

Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, postcard

Recently, by going through family photos, albums and scrapbooks, these three old Cleveland postcards of Euclid Avenue, University Circle and the Hollenden building, were discovered, passed down through our family. I love old Cleveland pictures, and it is even interesting seeing the written correspondence and stamps on some of them.

People crave nostalgia, and Clevelander’s enjoy anything Cleveland! Progress in civilization changes things so quickly, which we can mostly tell by looking back.

I’ve noticed, working in the graphics industry, that back in the day of keylines, typesetting,

university circle cleveland ohio postcard

University Circle, Cleveland, Ohio, postcard

hand-lettering and illustration (for me it was 1970s through early 1990s), we strived to achieve a polished high end look that was difficult to manufacture by hand. Then when the desktop publishing-capable computers were introduced it seemed to be the answer to our hopes. We could generate clean text and grab clip art graphics. However, by the late 1990s fonts were being created with a hand-written or grunge look. Stock illustration was less sleek and more stroked and textured. We sought a more natural look from our computer layouts, and for the visuals to appear to be more authentic.

hollenden building cleveland ohio postcard

Hollenden Building, Cleveland Ohio, postcard

I have found a similar comparison with the direction of cameras and photography. Over time we have made many improvements to cameras and photographic imagery. From tin to plates to film to now digital cameras with ever-increasing megapixels and other features. How ironic that we get software and app filters to give us an old sepia tone or vintage look.

The innovative Instagram, available first, offered a multiple digital image filter app that could be applied from a phone or tablet and posted on the world wide web for millions to see and took off in popularity. And there are many more other apps that now do the same thing, most recently Twitter and Flickr.

Seeing old postcards is still special. That is when the imagery was the best it could be. It brings us back to a time when we had other priorities. You can just tell by these postcards that the fancy architecture shown would have drawn visitors to Cleveland, and that people were out catching cable cars, operating their horse-drawn carriages while going downtown to shop or work at their businesses, and other things of the day. It starts-off our imaginations when we look at them.

euclid avenue cleveland ohio postcard

Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, postcard

university circle cleveland ohio postcard

University Circle, Cleveland, Ohio, postcard

hollenden building cleveland ohio postcard

Hollenden Building, Cleveland, Ohio, postcard