Cleveland Exhibit Fall 2017 at Cleveland History Center

March 23, 2017

Western Reserve Historical Society 150 Years, Sharing Our StoriesThis year, the Western Reserve Historical Society / Cleveland History Center celebrates 150 years! Many talks, events, and exhibits have been scheduled throughout the year labeled ‘Sharing Our Stories.’ Northeast Ohioans are invited to share their story.

Cleveland Starts Here exhibitA permanent exhibit and digital portal that explores the rich and diverse history of Cleveland and Northeast Ohio is being constructed. The exhibit is Cleveland Starts Here and will open November 1, 2017.

And if you stop by the museum’s gift shop, you will find a freshened stock of my Cleveland prints and note cards in time for the Fall exhibit.

Cleveland Prints by Janet Dodrill

Cleveland Prints by Janet Dodrill

#CleStartsHere
#WRHS150

Resource Links:

Cleveland Starts Here exhibit, November 1, 2017
https://www.wrhs.org/cleveland-starts-here/

Sharing Our Stories
https://www.wrhs.org/share-your-story/

Western Reserve Historical Society / Cleveland History Center Events
https://www.wrhs.org/events/

Copyright article and images. All rights reserved. Not to be used without permission.

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Archibald Willard, Friend to Hugo Max Schmitz of Schmitz-Horning Co.

February 27, 2017

By Janet Dodrill

Hugo Max Schmitz I (late 1800s).  (Schmitz family archives)

Hugo Max Schmitz I (late 1800s). (Schmitz family archives)

It is believed that in the 1890s, a promising artist left his family and relatives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and made his way to Cleveland, perhaps attracted to its thriving art community. He was Hugo Max Schmitz (1867-1938), my great grandfather, and in his mid-30s. Hugo, of German descent, joined Cleveland’s Art Club (formerly know as The Bohemians) and attended regular drawing sessions in its location above City Hall, and participated in their exhibits and possibly traveled abroad with other artists.

President of the established Art Club (and also co-founder and trustee) at the time was notable northeast Ohio artist Archibald MacNeal Willard (1836-1918). He was best known for his painting of The Spirit of ’76. He was born in Bedford, Ohio and at the age of 17 moved to Wellington, Ohio. There is a museum in Wellington in his honor.

Photo portrait of Archibald Willard, restored (Schmitz family archives).

Photo portrait of Archibald Willard, restored (Schmitz family archives).

Archibald Willard was a prolific artist who worked in a variety of mediums and subject matters. He was a talented portrait artist as well as landscape artist.

In addition to the Wellington museum, several Cleveland museums carry his work including the Cleveland Museum of Art and Cleveland History Center/Western Reserve Historical Society. A dedicated plot just east of Cleveland City Hall is known as Willard Park.

A search in Cleveland’s The Plain Dealer archived newspaper articles, resulted in stories about Cleveland artists which included Archibald Willard and photos of him working in his studio.

Archibald MacNeal Willard in his studio (Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer, December 17, 1899, Several of Cleveland's Well Known Artists Seen At Work In Their Studios).

Archibald MacNeal Willard in his studio (Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer, December 17, 1899, Several of Cleveland’s Well Known Artists Seen At Work In Their Studios).

He had a friendship with Hugo, and gave him a portrait photo of himself, plus as a wedding gift in 1902 an original landscape oil painting, which resembles the area’s Chagrin River. In addition my great grandfather received a small statue of The Spirit of ’76 from Mr. Willard, which may be a one of a kind working prototype in porcelain by Stanway.

Hugo Max Schmitz co-founded the Schmitz-Horning Company in 1905, a well-regarded scenic wall paper and mural manufacturing firm, and was president of the company until 1938, when his son Warren Reynolds Schmitz ran it until the company’s closing around 1960.

Landscape oil painting by Archibald Willard (Schmitz family archives).

Landscape oil painting by Archibald Willard (Schmitz family archives).

Statue of Spirit of '76 by Archibald Willard (Schmitz family archives).

Statue of Spirit of ’76 by Archibald Willard (Schmitz family archives).

Copyright article and images. All rights reserved. Not to be used without permission.

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Dale Chihuly Glass

March 30, 2016

By Janet Dodrill

Colored glass has always appealed to me. Glassmaking and glassblowing began to amaze me when I was introduced to the work and glass studio artist, Dale Chihuly.

In 1998, my late mother and I went to see ‘Chihuly: The George R. Stroemple Collection‘ at the Akron Art Museum in Akron, Ohio. There, we walked in under a Chihuly Chandelier, and were directed first to see a film on the artist’s background, his drawing and glassmaking process, and worldwide installations – after which we were free to roam the museum’s gallery. It was a spectacular exhibit which included a cross-section of his work, including Drawings, Irish Cylinders, Macchia, Venetians, Laguna Murano, and Seaform sculptures.

A couple years ago visited a local BOSE store and on their big screen TV was a film on Chihuly. It was a great way to showcase the manufacturer’s technology by showing an interesting glass blowing demo so vibrant with color.

Recently, I have been enjoying the glass art sculpture images posted regularly from the Chihuly Facebook page.

To fully appreciate his work I suggest viewing some of the many videos available online. (Some online links are below.)

Better yet, if you get the opportunity to see his work up close, I would strongly encourage it!

Ahuja Azure, Citron and Amber Persian Wall, 2010, commissioned glass sculpture by Dale Chihuly, at University Hospital's Ahuja Medical Center cafeteria, Beachwood, Ohio.

Ahuja Azure, Citron and Amber Persian Wall, 2010, commissioned glass sculpture by Dale Chihuly, at University Hospital’s Ahuja Medical Center cafeteria, Beachwood, Ohio.

Chihuly Website:
http://www.chihuly.com

Chihuly Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/chihuly

Dale Chihuly YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/user/chihulystudio

Chihuly Workshop YouTube Channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCq4z5XFpGwB8EMXucfNcByg

Chihuly Studio Vimeo Channel:
https://vimeo.com/user25444452

The George R. Stroemple Collection
http://www.stroemplecollection.com

Akron Art Museum
https://akronartmuseum.org

(Text and photo copyright Janet Dodrill. Not to be used without prior permission.)

Chihuly Facebook page screen.

(Chihuly Facebook page screen.)

Chihuly Facebook page screen.

(Chihuly Facebook page screen.)

Chihuly Facebook page screen.

(Chihuly Facebook page screen.)

 


Squaw Rock by Henry Church Jr.

December 13, 2013

By Janet Dodrill

ink sketch by Janet Dodrill of Squaw Rock by Henry Church Jr 1885

Squaw Rock by Henry Church Jr. 1885, ink sketch by Janet Dodrill.

On a walk down a path at the South Chagrin Reservation known as Squaw Rock sits a mammoth-sized rock on the bank of the Chagrin River that was carved by an artist in1885. That artist was self-taught Henry Church Jr. (1836-1908), American primitive painter and sculptor, but blacksmith by profession, from Chagrin Falls, Ohio. Squaw Rock’s formal name is ‘The Rape of the Indian Tribes by the White Man’ and it stands 30 feet high. The carving includes a woman (squaw) surrounded by a snake, a baby (papoose), skeleton, eagle, shield, flag, hatchet, arrows, and dog.

I read somewhere once that Henry used to secretly travel to the carving site by night, working by lantern, in hopes that the rock would be ‘discovered’ one day and believed to be carved by Indians, but I cannot locate the posting again to support this.

In recent years it has been vandalized and damaged. The squaw’s face and breasts have been defaced, and nature has taken its course and the stone face has deteriorated. After Church died, WPA (Works Project Administration) built a base under the rock to protect it from the river. I remember going there as a child, and even though my father was an avid photographer then and I so in more recent years, we have no early photographs, or any for that matter, of the rock at all.

In 1999 I visited the rock and did this ink sketch, as a result of an organized ‘hike and sketch’ event by the parks, which I participated in with my later mother and father who also appreciated his work.

Church carved a lion with a lamb for his own funeral stone, which is currently on long-term loan at the Cleveland Museum of Art, and pre-recorded his own funeral sermon on a wax gramophone cylinder. Though most of his painting were destroyed by his daughter after his death, he is also known for his painting The Monkey Picture (28″ x 44″, oil on paper, mounted on oil cloth, 1895-1900) which is on permanent collection at Abbey Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Center.

Sources:

The Encyclopedia of Cleveland History
http://ech.case.edu/cgi/article.pl?id=CHJ

AskART
http://www.askart.com/askart/c/henry_church/henry_church.aspx

Antiques & Fine Art Magazine (The Monkey Picture)
http://www.antiquesandfineart.com/articles/article.cfm?request=836

The Sculpture Center, Outdoor Ohio Sculpture Inventory
http://oosi.sculpturecenter.org/items/show/945

Photos of Squaw Rock:

The Plain Dealer, Cleveland, Ohio
http://photos.cleveland.com/plain-dealer/2013/11/squawjpg.html

CarCow.com, The Famous Squaw Rock
http://www.cardcow.com/44282/famous-squaw-rock-chagrin-falls-ohio/

South Chagrin Reservation, Cleveland Metroparks
http://hikingohioparks.com/south-chagrin-reservation-hiking-ohio-parks.html


Gallery One Offers Art & Technology Interactivity at Cleveland Museum of Art

February 22, 2013

By Janet Dodrill

Gallery One Image Touch Screen Wall

Gallery One’s Image Touch Screen Wall, at the Cleveland Museum of Art

Like art and technology? The recently opened Gallery One at Cleveland Museum of Art offers something for the whole family.

A room with a giant wall touch screen allows you to hand-pan through over 3,500

gallery one make a face kiosk

Gallery One’s Make a Face kiosk, matches art up to your facial expression.

images from the museum’s world-renowned permanent collection. The experience is enriching, and categories and themes of art are visually presented and refreshed often. I was informed by a tour guide that each touch tile cost $8,000 and it is the only one of its kind in the country. One of the tiles was pulled off the wall for us to see the light source and electronics behind it. We were ensured that the wall screen is wiped down twice daily for cleanliness!

gallery oneapplication matches your gesture to art

Gallery One’s application matches your gesture to art.

Draw any shape in the Studio Play exploring room on a kiosk called ‘Line and Shape’, and it visually pairs-up and displays a museum object using that shape, whether it’s an edge of a ceramic vase, or a design in a tapestry.

‘Make a Face’ lets you make a face in front of a kiosk which is shot by a web cam, and

gallery one clay vessel creation simulation

Gallery One’s clay vessel creation simulation.

is matched to a face in the museum’s collection and displays them side by side. The same idea is used in making a body gesture by standing in front of the screen. A sculpture with a similar pose appears next to your image.

On the same kiosk, use the touch screen and take a slab of clay and roll it, cut it and create a vessel.

gallery one touch technology

Gallery One’s image touch technology wall.

Bring your iPad or rent one there for $5 (the rentals use a great iPad case called GripCase, available at the museum gift shop or online), and run the ArtLens free app (iOS only). You can download it at the app store prior to your visit, and enjoy information and videos about the Gallery One collection even if off-site. Utilize it there and get assigned a special plastic disc with a micro-chip to pair your tablet up with the touch wall. Scroll through images with your hand on the wall and find your favorites. Press a heart shape under that image and it will save it to your iPad in a favorites list. Then your iPad allows you to share those images by email or social media, or create a custom tour which can be saved and viewed later, which includes detailed information about those particular works of art.

gallery one near you now app feature

Gallery One’s near you now app feature.

gallery one artlens app gives information on art

Gallery One’s ArtLens app gives information on art.

Travel around the room in the Gallery One exhibit (I was told photo-taking works on your iPad is allowed here), use ArtLens to let your device show you where you are in the exhibit using the ‘Near You Now’ feature. Hold up your tablet lens to a work of art, and your app will bring up a detailed description of that work of art which may include audio or video. Don’t want to use an iPad? There is a floor kiosk in each area of the Gallery One exhibit floor to allow you to call-up more information on the art you are standing near, or interact by taking polls. Works in this exhibit include works by Pablo Picasso, Auguste Rodin, Viktor Schreckengost, Giovanni Panini, and Chuck Close.

a gallery one interactive kiosk

A Gallery One interactive kiosk.

See all this and even more attractions at this wonderful art and technology-based interactive gallery. Also on your trip there, enjoy the space in the new atrium, visit the restaurant, and explore the fabulous new museum store.

Related Links:

The Cleveland Museum of Art/ learn/in the galleries

ArtLens | Cleveland Museum of Art

Applause (video) ArtLens at the Cleveland Museum of Art

ArtLens app at the Cleveland Museum of Art is impressive, but it has a few glitches, The Plain Dealer